Patrons: Bill Beaumont & Mark Lawrenson Reg Charity No: 512186

Welcome to the Woodside Clinic

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Our lymphoedema service is based in the Woodside Clinic within the grounds of St Catherine’s Park.

The award-winning team treats cancer and non-cancer related lymphoedema – a condition which affects our lymphatic system, the process by which we filter and drain waste fluid from our bodies. If this system stops working, the accumulation of fluid in the body’s tissues causes swelling known as lymphoedema.

There are two types – primary, which is often hereditary – and secondary – which can be brought about by cancer treatment, surgery, trauma or infection.
The NHS-funded team at St Catherine’s offers treatments to ease discomfort, improve quality of life and boost independence.

They are all highly trained to provide people with the information they need to understand and manage their symptoms through a range of tailored therapies.
This includes traditional methods such as drainage and bandaging, as well as treatments using the latest pioneering equipment.

The team is based in the state-of-the-art Woodside Clinic which boosts four clinical treatment rooms, wetroom, office space, welcoming reception and pleasant outdoor courtyard.

The clinic is classed as a LITE Suite – standing for Lymphoedema Intensive Therapy Experience – and was opened in August 2014 thanks to generous funding from The Wolfson Foundation and Redrow Homes Ltd. It offers a therapeutic, clinical environment to enhance comfort, privacy and dignity; improved cleanliness and infection control; and further space to carry out state-of-the-art treatments using equipment such as lasers and compression pumps.

The service treats children as well as adults, providing the only paediatric lymphoedema service in the North West.

For information on how to be referred to the Woodside Clinic click here
For information on treatment options click here
For information about our service for babies, children and adolescents click here